Tournament Guide

Make Your Tournament Official


If you would like to your tournament to be listed here on the official Ascension web site, fill out our New Event Form.

Formats


As an Ascension tournament organizer, may run any format you wish. The format should be clearly listed wherever event information is posted. To determine the format you must decide on the following:

  • What sets will be used?
  • Heads-up or Multiplayer?
  • Single elimination or Swiss?
    • If the event is Swiss will there be a playoff? (cut to top 8, for example)

 

Format details should be clearly listed wherever event information is posted.

 

What Sets Will Be Used?


Ascension is a very flexible game. While the sets are designed to be played in blocks (the large set and the small set from a year together) you can play with any combination of sets (and promo cards).

Ascension Blocks

  • Chronicle of the Godslayer & Return of the Fallen
  • Storm of Souls & Immortal Heroes
  • Rise of Vigil & Darkness Unleashed

Again, the blocks are listed here for reference only. You may choose any combination of sets to use in your event.

 

Heads-up or Multiplayer?


  • Heads-up is a 2 player game (like a chess tournament)
  • Multiplayer is up to 4 players per game.

A multiplayer Swiss event may have either a multiplayer or a heads-up playoff.

This impacts the number of games needed to run your event. You will need one copy of Ascension for every:

  • 4 players in the tournament, rounding up, for multiplayer
  • 2 players in the tournament, rounding down, for heads-up

 

Entry Fee


Entry fees are optional. The event organizer may set any event fee he/she wishes. The event fee should be clearly listed wherever event information is posted.

 

Prizes


Prizes are optional. The event organizer may provide any prizes he/she wishes. The prizes should be clearly listed wherever event information is posted.

 

Rounds


Each round consists of 1 game of Ascension. Each round will take about 30 to 40 minutes to play. When planning your event be sure to leave about 10 minutes per round to record results and set up for the next round.

 

Players-per-game in Multiplayer events


Each round of a multiplayer event you will break your players up into tables such that you have as few tables as possible, and players distributed as evenly as possible. In a Swiss tournament, the players with the best record should always be at the table(s) with the most players.

Number of players Number of players at each table
1-4 1 table with all players
5 3 / 2
6 3 / 3
7 4 / 3
8 4 / 4
9 3 / 3 / 3
10 4 / 3 / 3
11 4 / 4 / 3
12 4 / 4 / 4
13 4 / 3 / 3 / 3
14 4 / 4 / 3 / 3
15 4 / 4 / 4 / 3
16 4 / 4 / 4 / 4
17 4 / 4 / 3 / 3 / 3
And so on…

Single Elimination


In a Single Elimination tournament, each round the winner of each table advances and all other players are eliminated. This format is very fast, but doesn’t give players a lot of play time. This can be a good format if you have very limited time, such as with a weekday evening event.

Single Elimination rounds will continue until there is only 1 player left. Any number of players may play.

 

Heads-up single elimination event


In round one of a heads-up single elimination tournament you must give out a number of byes (a bye is where a player has no opponent and automatically wins the round) that will get you to a power of 2 (2,4,8,16,32,64,128, ect) for the second round.
For example, if you have 5 players in the event, in the first round, 2 players will play and 3 will have byes, thus you will have 4 players in round 2.

The number of rounds is determined by the number of players:

Number of Players Number of Rounds
2 Players 1 round
3-4 players 2 rounds
5-8 players 3 rounds
9-16 players 4 rounds
17-32 players 5 rounds
And so on.

Multiplayer single elimination event


All players still in the tournament play each round (no byes) see Players per game above.

Number of rounds is determined by the number of players:

Number of Players Number of Rounds
2-4 Players 1 round
5-16 players 2 rounds
17-64 players 3 rounds
And so on.

Swiss


In a Swiss tournament, all players get to play a set number of rounds. After these rounds are complete, prizes are given out based on record.

Some Swiss events will have a playoff (cut to top 8 for example). Playoffs are run like a separate single elimination tournament. Players who make the playoff receive their prizes at the end of the playoff based on their finish.

Heads-up Swiss events


There is a lot of event software out there for running Heads-Up Swiss events. The event organizer may feel free to run the event using any software and scoring system they wish. Just be sure to announce to the players at the beginning of the event what system you are using.

If you need to run your event on paper, you may use the following method:

Number of rounds (Recommended)

Number of Players Recommended Number of Rounds Recommended Number of Players in Playoff
2 1 None
3-4 2 None
5-8 3 2
9-16 4 4
17-32 5 8
33-64 6 8
65-128 7 8
Etc
For each player the event organizer will need to keep track of:

  • If that player won or lost each round
  • Who they played against that round
  • How much honor they won or lost by (maximum 50: if they win by more than 50 or their opponent concedes before the end of the game, record it as 50 points).
  • How many total points the player has (In a Heads up event players get 1 point for a win and 0 points for a loss.

Each round, starting with one of the players with the most points, pair that player up with a player with the same number of points, or as close to that as possible. Players may not play against the same opponent twice during the Swiss rounds.

At the end of the Swiss rounds, rank players by how many points (wins) they have.

If players are tied use the following tiebreakers:

1st tiebreaker: Did they win round 1?
2nd tiebreaker: Did they win round 2?
3rd tiebreaker: Did they win round 3?

Etc…

If there is still a tie, add up the honor a player won each match by and subtract the points they lost each match by. That honor total is the final tie breaker.

In the extremely unlikely event that you still have tied players, use a randomization device (such as a die or coin) to break the tie.

 

Multiplayer Swiss events


The event organizer may feel free to run the event using any software and scoring system they wish. Just be sure to announce to the players at the beginning of the event what system you are using at the start of the event.

If you need to run your event on paper, you may use the following method:
Number of rounds (Recommended)

Number of Players Recommended Number of Rounds Recommended Number of Players in Heads-Up Playoff Recommended Number of Players in Multiplayer Playoff
2-4 1 None None
5-8 2 2 None
9-16 3 4 4
17-64 4 8 8
65-256 5 8 16
256+ 6 8 16
For each player, the event organizer will need to keep track of:

  • What place that player finished at their table each round
  • How many players they played against each round
  • How many total points the player has (see below).

Each round the players get points as follows:

Table winner: 6 points
Second: 3 points
Third: 1 point
Fourth: 0 points

For example: In a 3 person table, the winner will get 6 points, 2nd will get 3 points and 3rd will get 1 point.

Each round, players should play at tables with players with a similar number of points.

So, put your top players at table 1, your next highest players at table 2, etc.

All players still in the tournament play each round (no byes) see Players per game above.

At the end of the Swiss rounds, rank players by how many points (wins) they have.

If players are tied use the following tiebreakers:

1st tiebreaker: Points earned round 1
2nd tiebreaker: Points earned round 2
3rd tiebreaker: Points earned round 3
Etc…

If players are still tied, go to the next set of tiebreakers:

Number of players at round 1 table (higher number wins)
Number of players at round 2 table
Etc…

If you still have tied players, use a randomization device (such as a die or coin) to break the tie.